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More Colorado Children Believed To Be Using Marijuana

A company involved in doing drug tests in Colorado, where voters opted last fall to legalize marijuana for recreational purposes, claims that the measure has been followed by a large increase in the number of children using pot. School districts in the state have increasingly called on the company to administer drug screening tests on students on a weekly rather than monthly basis. The company claims that in addition to a larger number of students failed drug tests, those who use drugs are doing so more often.

As new detox kits for marijuana testing are used among students now, the company now revealing levels of THC, the active ingredient in marijuana in the 500 nanograms per milliliter of blood level and higher, where before test results of 50 to 100 nanograms were more common. If true, this would mean a greater degree of drug intoxication. Such levels of THC, the company states, are indicative that a student likely is using the drug as often as daily, as opposed to once or twice a week.

Some believe that teenagers who exhibit that level of THC in their blood should not be permitted to drive, for fear that they may get involved in accidents. At least some recent research studiers claim that use of marijuana by motorists doubles the possibility of a car crash. Critics of marijuana use also argue that it may impair memory, and say that they believe that it may therefore be detrimental to the education of young peple.

Legalization of marijuana for recreational purposes in Colorado strictly limits it to people over the age of 21, which is similar to the legalization measure adopted in the state of Washington. No explanation was given as to how the legalization of marijuana for adults could lead to increased drug use among minors, if indeed it actually has. The state had previously legalized the prescribing of marijuana for medical purposes as a minority but growing number of other states have done.